Home About Willis Carrier Contact Us Carrier.com
Home
1876

The Invention That Changed The World

On July 17, 1902, Willis Haviland Carrier designed the first modern air-conditioning system, launching an industry that would fundamentally improve the way we live, work and play.

READ MORE

1903

The Launch of Carrier Air Conditioning Company

In the opening decades of the 20th century, Willis Carrier established Carrier Air Conditioning of America as the worldwide leader, advancing the science and application of air conditioning across multiple industries around the globe.

READ MORE

1915

Manufactured Weather

Launched as an independent company in 1915 by Willis Carrier and six other courageous entrepreneurs, Carrier Engineering Corporation provided manufactured weather to over 200 industries with an unmatched promise of "the whole job, the whole responsibility, and a contract for results."

READ MORE

1923

Beyond the Factory

The introduction of centrifugal refrigeration by Willis Carrier in 1922 was a landmark event, launching modern air conditioning from the factory floor into movie theaters, office buildings and department stores, and treating the general public to its first taste of cool, clean and comfortable "Manufactured Weather."

READ MORE

1930

Weathermaker to the World

Despite the Great Depression, Carrier Corporation never stopped investing in the art and science of air conditioning leading the industry in railroad and marine applications, and pioneering the creation of efficient systems for business and home. The company extended its reach to markets in every corner of the globe, enhancing its unparalleled position as "Weathermakers to the World."

READ MORE

1941

Distinguished Service

Carrier Corporation provided exceptional leadership throughout World War II even as it prepared diligently to meet the needs of a postwar world. In his final decade, Willis Carrier successfully completed one of the most satisfying projects of his storied career before becoming Chairman Emeritus and turning his company over to a new generation of leadership.

READ MORE

1951

Growing With the Babyboomers

A half-century after his invention of modern air conditioning, Willis Carrier's rich legacy included the creation of a billion-dollar industry and founding of the preeminent global provider of commercial air conditioning. In the next 25 years, Carrier Corporation grew with the postwar baby boom to become the largest player in the flourishing market for residential comfort air that would change the face of the world.

READ MORE

1979

Expanded Global Reach

The marriage of United Technologies Corporation with Carrier proved to be a formidable combination, resulting in creation of a Global Manufacturing Platform and market leadership in every region of the world, backed by an unparalleled commitment to environmental sustainability.

READ MORE

1994

Natural Leadership

Built on Willis Carrier's extraordinary invention of modern air conditioning and his unyielding commitment to innovation, Carrier today is a lean, focused company meeting the needs of local markets with global resources, and leading the industry with products that delight customers while protecting our fragile envirionment—natural leadership for the 21st century.

READ MORE

1876-1902
Willis Carrier

On July 17, 1902,
Willis Haviland Carrier
designed the first modern air-conditioning system, launching an industry that would fundamentally improve the way we live, work and play.

This 1902 schematic drawing shows the likely air-conditioning system installed at Sackett & Wilhelms, a Brooklyn, New York, printing company desperate to find a solution to the humidity problems plaguing its printing processes.

 

The Invention That Changed the World

On July 17, 1902, a young research engineer initialed a set of mechanical drawings designed to solve a production problem at the Sackett & Wilhelms Lithography and Printing Company in Brooklyn, New York. These were not the first drawings that 25-year-old Willis Carrier had prepared on behalf of his new employer, the Buffalo Forge Company. Since graduation from Cornell University a year earlier, this modest but gifted engineer had turned out designs for a heating plant, a lumber dry kiln and a coffee dryer, among others. Such products were the stock-in-trade of Buffalo Forge, a respected supplier of forges, fans and hot blast heaters.

This new design was different—so novel, in fact, that it would not only help to solve a problem that had long plagued printers, but would one day launch a company and create an entire industry essential to global productivity and personal comfort.

In this artist's conceptualization, Willis Carrier starts the engine that will drive the world's first modern air-conditioning system, installed in the summer of 1902 at the Sackett & Wilhelms printing plant in Brooklyn, New York. This illustration appeared in the August 1954 edition of Steelways magazine which noted, thanks to Carrier, that "air conditioning spread through the industry like a cool breeze."

 

The problem began with paper. In the spring of 1902, consulting engineer Walter Timmis visited the Manhattan office of J. Irvine Lyle, the head of Buffalo Forge's sales activities in New York. Timmis' client, Sackett & Wilhelms, found that humidity at its Brooklyn plant wreaked havoc with the color register of its fine, multicolor printing. Ink, applied one color at a time, would misalign with the expansion and contraction of the paper stock. This caused poor quality, scrap waste and lost production days, Timmis said. Judge magazine happened to be one of the important clients whose production schedule was at risk. Timmis had some ideas about how to approach the problem but would need help. Was Buffalo Forge interested?

 

This beautiful, multicolor edition of the July 18, 1903, Judge magazine was among the first commercial products ever to benefit from modern air conditioning. Willis carrier's invention would soon be embraced by a variety of other industries worldwide, including textiles, rubber, confectionery and pharmaceutical.

 

A 1903 group portrait of the engineers of Buffalo Forge Company includes Willis Carrier (bottom row, third from right) and his future business partner, J. Irvine Lyle (middle row, sixth from left). Carrier, Lyle and five fellow engineers would launch Carrier Engineering Corporation as an independent entity in 1915.

One of Lyle's great skills was his ability to assess new business opportunities, and he grasped this one immediately. He knew that engineers had long been able to heat, cool and humidify air. Sometimes, as a result of cooling, they had also been able to reduce humidity. But precise control of humidity in a manufacturing environment—that was something entirely new. Lyle also had an innate ability for sizing up people. In this case, he believed he knew the engineer who could tackle this problem, a recent Cornell University graduate who had already impressed many people at Buffalo Forge. So, Lyle accepted Timmis' challenge and sent the problem to Willis Carrier, the first step in a long and prosperous collaboration.

 

Energized by the puzzle, Carrier immediately grasped the issues and began his investigation by means of rigorous testing and intensive data-gathering, hallmarks of his long career. His first test was recommended by Timmis and involved a roller towel with loosely woven burlap saturated with a solution of calcium chloride brine. While the apparatus removed humidity, it added heat, salt and odor to the air, none being acceptable in the printing process.

The Blueprint of an Industry

Carrier then tried his own experiment, replacing steam with cold water flowing through heating coils, balancing the temperature of the coil surface with the rate of air flow to pull the air temperature down to the desired dew point temperature. Even as he worked, Carrier knew that every part of the process—from metal coils prone to rust, to inexact Weather Bureau tables—could be improved. Nonetheless, he and his team moved steadily forward, completing drawings and sending them to Lyle to be implemented.

The first set of coils was installed at the Sackett & Wilhelms plant late in the summer of 1902 along with fans, ducts, heaters, perforated steam pipes for humidification, and temperature controls. Cooling water was drawn from an artesian well that first summer and supplemented by an ammonia compressor in the spring of 1903 to meet the demands of the first full summer of operation. This system of chilled coils was designed to maintain a constant humidity of 55 percent year-round and have the equivalent cooling effect of melting 108,000 pounds of ice per day.

Lyle's bet paid off. On October 21, 1903, he reported in a letter to his home office that, "The cooling coils which we sold this company have given excellent results during the past summer." This confirmed his faith in both the opportunity, and in the exceptional talent of the young engineer who had directed the project. Willis Carrier had demonstrated the intellect, creativity and vision to assemble everything that had gone on before him, improve upon it, and create something entirely new.

The drawings were dated July 17, 1902. After that, nothing would be the same. Modern air conditioning was born.

 

This drawing, the result of Willis Carrier's groundbreaking design, was submitted to Sackett & Wilhelms on July 17, 1902, and provided the basis for the invention that would change the world, the first modern air-conditioning system.